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Sat 27 May, 2017

02:07 Virgin Active Becomes First Gym To Integrate Amazon Alexa» Forbes Real Time
Members can preserve their energy for when it matters the most, and schedule workouts, check out the newest classes and their locations from the comfort of their couch
01:50 The newest version of 'Trumpcare' may have some alarming implications for the opioid crisis» Markets

Donald Trump Paul Ryan

The Congressional Budget Office on Wednesday released an updated analysis of the American Health Care Act, the House GOP healthcare bill, that economists and advocates said contained some alarming takeaways for the future of the fight against the opioid crisis.

While the nonpartisan CBO projected that 23 million more Americans would be uninsured by 2026 under the AHCA compared with projections under the current healthcare system, two other issues are contained within those numbers.

The first: The newly amended AHCA keeps largely in place the more than $800 billion in cuts to federal Medicaid spending over the next decade from the original version of the bill.

It does so by rolling back the Medicaid expansion established under the Affordable Care Act as well as other changes under the law. The CBO estimates that, under the AHCA, approximately 14 million people would come off the Medicaid rolls by 2026.

The second issue, and one not present in the previous version of the AHCA, is the so-called MacArthur Amendment, which would allow states to apply for permission to rescind some of the Affordable Care Act's regulations if they introduce policies designed to lower insurance premiums.

The CBO found that about one-third of the US population lives in states that would most likely make "moderate changes" to regulations under the MacArthur Amendment and about one-sixth lives in states that would make more extensive changes.

Christine Eibner, a health economist for the Rand Corporation, said that while there was a lot of uncertainty about how states would change regulations, it was reasonable to think state legislators would be under a lot of pressure to cut back on so-called essential health benefits, or certain conditions that insurers are required to cover, if other states are able to show that doing so brings down premiums. If that happens, substance-abuse treatment is viewed as the benefit "most at risk" to be cut, Eibner told Business Insider.

Approximately 1.84 million people in the US are receiving treatment for substance-use disorders or mental illnesses through the Medicaid expansion or the ACA's individual insurance marketplace, according to research conducted by Richard Frank, a professor of health economics at Harvard Medical School, and Sherry Glied, a dean at New York University. All of those people would be at risk of losing the approximately $5.5 billion paid out for treatment through those two avenues of insurance.

A 2017 Health and Human Services report found that approximately 34% of individual-market insurance plans did not cover substance-abuse treatment before the Affordable Care Act. Under the AHCA, a similar number would most likely either not cover treatment or begin underwriting substance-use disorder as a preexisting condition for thousands of dollars in premium surcharges, making insurance prohibitively expensive, Frank told Business Insider.

Eibner said the individual market wasn't the only place where treatment coverage would be affected. While she said employer-sponsored insurance would most likely continue to cover treatment, she expected Medicaid programs in states rolling back regulations related to the essential health benefits to cut substance-abuse treatment coverage as well.

Amendments to the AHCA allocate $15 billion over nine years and $8 billion over five years, respectively, to offset some of the costs to consumers if states waive benefits like substance-abuse treatment coverage and coverage for Americans with preexisting conditions. Frank found in his preliminary calculations, however, that those funds would be exhausted many times over in just a few short years just to pay for treatment for opioid-use disorder and serious mental-health conditions, leaving aside the myriad other conditions those funds are supposed to help cover.

BI Graphics_Drug OverdosesGary Mendell, the CEO of Shatterproof, a national nonprofit working to end the opioid crisis, has come out fervently against the bill.

"It's unbelievable that in the middle of a crisis our legislators would even consider reducing access to insurance for those needing treatment for substance-use disorder," Mendell told Business Insider.

While Mendell said he had engaged with the Trump administration over its ongoing commission dedicated to tackling the opioid crisis, he said that if the AHCA were signed into law, the administration and Republicans would have "zero credibility" in trying to fix the crisis because of how many people would be likely to lose access to treatment.

An analysis conducted by Eibner and Christopher Whaley, a policy researcher at Rand, found that in places that waive substance-treatment benefits, the out-of-pocket cost for consumers who use those benefits could rise by $1,333 a year. For "high-need" consumers, like those who need an in-patient stay at a treatment facility, out-of-pocket costs could rise to $12,261 a year.

"This assumes people still continue to use treatment," Eibner said. "Some may not seek it at all if it becomes too expensive."

Mendell said the AHCA would make substance-abuse treatment prohibitively expensive and, in particular, medication-assisted treatment, or MAT.

Considered by many experts to be the "gold standard" for overcoming opioid addiction, MAT uses prescription medications like buprenorphine or methadone to reduce cravings, allowing patients to work on the underlying issues leading to their substance use without the constant pressure of withdrawal.

Because of its promising results, MAT has gained bipartisan support in statehouses and on Capitol Hill, but it's expensive and remains difficult to access.

Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price said in West Virginia earlier this month that MAT amounted to "substituting one opioid for another," a claim almost universally rejected by scientific, medical, and treatment communities. Mendell went so far as to call Price's statement a "dangerous comment that perpetuates misinformation."

SEE ALSO: Trump's proposed trillion-dollar cuts to Medicaid are a stunning reversal from one of his biggest campaign promises

DON'T MISS: GOP healthcare bill would leave 23 million more uninsured, undermine protections for people with preexisting conditions

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NOW WATCH: China built a $350 million bridge that ends in a dirt field in North Korea

01:32 Some Of The Best Websites For Seniors To Find New Ways To Get Up, Get Out And Meet Up In 2017» Forbes Real Time
Opportunities abound today for older adults to get up, get out and meet up. And whatever activity you choose, the Internet has no doubt made it easier than ever for older adults to connect with friends, family and their communities and to find out what passions they may want to pursue in retirement.
01:23 Bitcoin and Tech Stocks: A 21st Century Tulipmania?» Barron's Most Viewed Today
Investors’ enthusiasm is reminiscent of the mania that struck the Dutch in the 1600s.
01:07 Q1 US GDP Growth Revised Up To A Still Weak 1.2%» Forbes Real Time
US GDP has been revised up from terribly weak to solidly weak. But we know very well there are calculation errors in there contributing to some to much of that.
00:53 Oh, Lord, Why Won't Donald Trump Buy Me A Mercedes Benz?» Forbes Real Time
Donald Trump should applaud, not scorn, German auto companies selling cars, investing in plants and employing workers in America.
00:52 Zuckerberg's Harvard Speech Shows He Doesn't Quite Get The Economics Of Jobs And Automation» Forbes Real Time
Only if we do get this right in our own minds are we going to be able to react correctly to technological change. There's absolutely nothing wrong at all with grand projects, with million cooperating to achieve them. But it's the project we want to achieve, the jobs are the cost of doing so.
00:12 After trip's final day, Trump to return to tumult at home» AP Top Business News at 12:09 a.m. EDT
TAORMINA, Italy (AP) -- Down to the final day of his lengthy first international trip, President Donald Trump will lift off for Washington having rattled some allies and reassured others, returning to a White House that sits under a cloud of scandal....

Fri 26 May, 2017

23:37 The Tell: Why one hedge-fund titan is bracing for ‘all hell to break lose’ in the stock market» MarketWatch.com - Top Stories
Billionaire investor Paul Singer has a bleak outlook for Wall Street and has built a $5 billion rainy-day fund in preparation for what he describes as “all hell” to be loosed upon the world.
23:36 After 33 hours, Delta Air Lines finally releases puppy from cargo in Guatemala » MarketWatch.com - Top Stories
Woman says her German Shepherd, Bunny, was held ‘hostage’ by bureaucracy and paperwork.
23:13 Debt ceiling could be hit this summer: Sources» Top News & Analysis
The White House is starting to warn that the debt ceiling could be reached late this summer, according to two sources.
23:08 NASA's Latest Capsules Expected to Pose Greater Risks Than Projected» WSJ.com: US Business
NASA’s next-generation manned spacecraft, initially envisioned to be roughly 10 times safer than the retired space shuttle fleet, will fall significantly short of that goal, according to industry and former agency officials.
23:00 Medal Of Honor Recipient Warns: "It's Going To Come Here... Trump Must Release The Gates Of Hell" On Islamic State»

Authored by Mac Slavo via SHTFplan.com,

With British Prime Minister Theresa May warning that another attack may be imminent, Medal of Honor Recipient Dakota Meyer says that it’s time to strike Islamic State strongholds without mercy, because sooner or later we could well witness suicide bombers detonating themselves in the middle of large crowds right here at home.

Arguing that President Obama, who awarded Meyer his Medal of Honor, was weak on ISIS and terrorism in general, he says President Trump should take a completely different strategy.

In short… it’s time to unleash the gates of hell…

I’ve been saying this is going to happen for a long time.

 

When is it coming here?

 

I think the only way you get this point across is that we release the gates of hell on them and we start making war so ugly that…their recruitment videos… it won’t be cool to join ISIS anymore.

 

And at some point we’re going to have to do that… this labeling of ‘it’s a lone wolf’ attack… or saying it’s not connected or this or that…

 

You can’t just ignore this problem because it’s going to come here…

 

The only thing I am optimistic about with this situation is that we have a President… think whatever you want about his politics…

 

At least we have a president that’s in place that’s not going to allow us to be the victims… you can guarantee he’s going to do whatever it’s going to take… no matter if it’s popular in the court of public opinion… he’s going to do what’s right to protect America…

Our guess?

President Trump was just warming up when he dropped this mother of all bombs on an ISIS complex in Afghanistan earlier this year:

22:40 Chairman of Meatpacker at Center of Brazil Corruption Probe Resigns» WSJ.com: US Business
The chairman of the world’s largest meat producer, JBS SA, stepped down Friday, weeks after telling prosecutors his company bribed Brazilian politicians, including President Michel Temer, in exchange for taxpayer-subsidized loans and other favors.
22:35 The Most Popular Books In History All Shared One Trait»

Throughout history, people have turned to works of literature for guidance, entertainment, and education. Modern businesses aim to tell stories that leave a long-lasting impact as well, and should look to examples of historical success to influence how they create their own content.

Today’s infographic comes to us from Global English Editing, and it looks at 20 of the most popular books in the world. As Visual Capitalist's Jeff Desjardins notes, all of the books listed, even those published decades or centuries ago, have made an enduring impact on readers to this day. They have achieved this by stirring discussion and sparking debate wherever they are read.

Courtesy of: Visual Capitalist

CONTROVERSY: THE EVERGREEN THEME

One of the important traits shared by every book on this list is the controversy that has swirled around each of them. This can be seen across different time periods and genres.

People have questioned the identity and authorial authenticity of Homer and decried the upending of creationism proposed by Darwin. Even a children’s book like the modern bestselling series, Harry Potter, can be a magnet for discussion over what is morally right and wrong.

It is often the case the that most popular and enduring literary works will not only captivate, but also address controversial issues in such a way that people will be talking about them for generations.

LESSONS FROM HISTORY

The recent bestselling streak of George Orwell’s 1984, first published in 1950, is an interesting illustration of this trend.

The dystopian novel was banned upon its translation and release in the former USSR due to its implicit critique of Stalinist political ideology. By contrast, in the 1970s and 1980s, several American counties challenged 1984 on the grounds that it might promote communist ideals. In the 21st century, Orwell’s best-known work has been revisited by a new generation of readers as the American political climate continues to create new uncertainties about governance, the distortion of facts, and social control.

FOR BUSINESS CONTENT, BOLD WILL HOLD

The most popular books ever written can teach modern businesses a great deal about what it takes to make content that is evergreen, meaningful, and primed to engage their readers. Creating discussion is key in the age of the reactive “hot take” style of article. Your ability to stand out in the cultural, historical, or political context for having a point of view that many people find worthy of debating will give your work the staying power it needs.

Considering that within any given minute there are 2.4 million Google searches taking place and over 700,000 people logging into Facebook, this is no easy task. But whether it’s through a new product or via customer engagement, creating meaningful discussion is key to making a business’ voice heard through all the noise.

22:30 15 Ways To Make Yourself More Marketable» Forbes Real Time
Joe can tell that big changes are afoot in his company but he doesn't know whether or not his job will be affected. Either way, Joe wants to start thinking about a job search and needs advice on making himself more marketable to employers. Here are 15 suggestions!